Our gay guide to the 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival

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Our gay guide to the 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival. Photo by Daisy Yang

What we may lack in numbers this year at the 2014 Vancouver Fringe Festival we certainly made up for in diversity.  Here is our guide to the LGBTQ show’s you don’t want to miss this year.

Meatloaf Jesus

Meat Loaf Jesus tells the story of three teenaged friends living in a small suburb of Edmonton. Hanging out at the local teen gathering spot, Mark suspects that Alex might be gay, too. In a drunken frenzy one night, the two hook up while Meat Loaf’s “Heaven Can Wait” plays in the background. As Alex begins a downward spiral after the encounter, Mark is desperate to help.  Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and showtimes.

Meatloaf Jesus

Meatloaf Jesus

Ludwig & Lohengrin

In Ludwig & Lohengrin, Calgary artist Kyall Rakoz brings the historically inspired story of King Ludwig II to the stage. Renowned for his patronage of the arts, the gay Ludwig struggles to reconcile the desires of the heart with societal expectations.  Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and information.

Kyall Rakoz in Ludwig & Lohengrin.  Photo by Jonathan Bower.

Kyall Rakoz in Ludwig & Lohengrin. Photo by Jonathan Bower.

The Chariot Cities

Unspoken truths, broken hearts, substance abuse and damaged souls may sound like a classic soap-opera story line, but The Chariot Cities is actually inspired by the work and lives of musical families like Canadian music legends the Wainwrights. They’re getting clean, coming out and going home. Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and information.

Jeff Gladstone as Jack Stackhouse in The Chariot Cities. Photo by Emily Cooper.

Jeff Gladstone as Jack Stackhouse in The Chariot Cities. Photo by Emily Cooper.

…didn’t see that coming

Television’s favourite fairy-tale granny, Beverley Elliott, takes a personal and irreverent look at her life, from small-town Ontario to Vancouver’s gay bars and onto the set of Once Upon a Time, in her one-woman autobiographical show …didn’t see that coming. Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and information.

Beverly Elliott in ...didn't see that coming. Photo by Robin Nielsen

Beverly Elliott in …didn’t see that coming. Photo by Robin Nielsen

Roller Derby Saved My Soul

Roller derby and superheroes collide in Nancy Kenny’s one-woman show Roller Derby Saved My Soul. Nominated for a 2014 Canadian Comedy Award, it tells the story of a shy 30-something geek who falls in love with both the sport and fellow player Diana. Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and information.

Nancy Kenny in Roller Derby Saved My Soul. Photo by Richard Gilmore

Nancy Kenny in Roller Derby Saved My Soul. Photo by Richard Gilmore

The Masks of Oscar Wilde

A modern day Wilde tells the story of his life as it intertwines lecture, storytelling and drama to reveal several masks he wore in his life and highlights some of his most notable works. Visit http://vancouverfringe.com for tickets and information.

The Frank Theatre Company season features works intended to embrace, expand and excite

The Masks of Oscar Wilde

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