On Vancouver stages: our weekly round-up from Vancouver Presents

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This week Vancouver Presents continues its 20 questions series, meets the next generation of illusionists, and reviews two plays on local stages.

Meet Vancouver-based actor Brendan Taylor. Brendan is currently appearing in Raul Sanchez Inglis’ For The Record (Apr 15-17) at Railtown Actors Studio. In For the Record, a young construction worker finds himself the victim of a police interrogation. While trying to piece together his memory of the drunken night before he claims innocence, while the two detectives look to force a confession from him. Read more.

Meet Vancouver-based actor Brendan Taylor. Brendan is currently appearing in Raul Sanchez Inglis’ For The Record (Apr 15-17) at Railtown Actors Studio. In For the Record, a young construction worker finds himself the victim of a police interrogation. While trying to piece together his memory of the drunken night before he claims innocence, while the two detectives look to force a confession from him. Read more.

Illusionists Oslen, a finalist on Canada’s Got Talent in 2012, and award-winning Kel team-up for a three-night run of what they promise to be a Vegas-style magic show at South Vancouver’s Metro Theatre. Read more.

Illusionists Oslen, a finalist on Canada’s Got Talent in 2012, and award-winning Kel team-up for a three-night run of what they promise to be a Vegas-style magic show at South Vancouver’s Metro Theatre. Read more.

n 2013, Marc Comoletti’s Boeing-Boeing was on my list of the best plays in Vancouver that year. With that memory still very much alive in my mind, there were huge expectations for his follow-up, Don’t Dress for Dinner. But while there is a nice physicality to the piece, which closes out the season at Richmond’s Gateway Theatre, this collection of slamming doors, stolen kisses and mistaken identities doesn’t quite soar as high as its predecessor. Read more.

n 2013, Marc Comoletti’s Boeing-Boeing was on my list of the best plays in Vancouver that year. With that memory still very much alive in my mind, there were huge expectations for his follow-up, Don’t Dress for Dinner. But while there is a nice physicality to the piece, which closes out the season at Richmond’s Gateway Theatre, this collection of slamming doors, stolen kisses and mistaken identities doesn’t quite soar as high as its predecessor. Read more.

Absolute power may corrupt absolutely, but in Ayad Akhtar’s The Invisible Hand it is the almighty dollar that feeds both. As the Panama Papers continue to make headlines around the world, confirming that the 99 percent are falling further behind, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar amps up the drama in a surprisingly quiet, but nonetheless powerful exploration of the connection between terrorism and money. And while the notion of terrorists funding themselves through the world’s investment markets is scary enough, Akhtar makes it all very human, and arguably more terrifying, by examining the nature of greed as well. Read more.

Absolute power may corrupt absolutely, but in Ayad Akhtar’s The Invisible Hand it is the almighty dollar that feeds both. As the Panama Papers continue to make headlines around the world, confirming that the 99 percent are falling further behind, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar amps up the drama in a surprisingly quiet, but nonetheless powerful exploration of the connection between terrorism and money. And while the notion of terrorists funding themselves through the world’s investment markets is scary enough, Akhtar makes it all very human, and arguably more terrifying, by examining the nature of greed as well. Read more.

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