On Vancouver stages: our weekly round-up from Vancouver Presents

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Brandon Bate, Kaitlin Williams, and John Voth in a scene from Pacific Theatre's It's A Wonderful Life Radio Show. Photo by Ron Reed.

There are a small handful of films that age well. These films, some say, transcend time. It’s a Wonderful Life directed by Frank Capra in 1946, is one of those films. It hits that remarkable pinpoint of sweetness and nostalgia that has made it a part of family Christmases for decades. Competing with such iconic cinematic chemistry would be nigh on impossible on stage, but Pacific Theatre’s It’s a Wonderful Life Radio Show manages to enhance, rather than compete with the original. It is, in a word, brilliant. Read more.

Scott Button as Tom and Marilyn Noory as Amanda in the Fire Escape Equity Co-op production of The Glass Menagerie. Photo by Mark Halliday.

Scott Button as Tom and Marilyn Noory as Amanda in the Fire Escape Equity Co-op production of The Glass Menagerie. Photo by Mark Halliday.

Another company tackling a show outside the usual holiday fare found this time of year, the Fire Escape Equity Co-op presents a gorgeous presentation of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie. Read more.

Claire Hesselgrave in the Twenty Something Theatre and Hardline Productions presentation of Wide Awake Hearts. Photo by Eric Chad.

Claire Hesselgrave in the Twenty Something Theatre and Hardline Productions presentation of Wide Awake Hearts. Photo by Eric Chad.

Perhaps because the characters in Brendan Gall’s Wide Awake Hearts are so self-centered, trying to relate to any of them was a lesson in futility. And while a selfish unlikability isn’t necessarily a recipe for a bad script, in Gall’s blurred world there is no easy way in for an audience that can’t care for its characters. Read more.

Josh Drebit, Donna Soares, Allan Zinyk, James Long in a scene from Cinderella: An East Van Panto. Photo by Emily Cooper.

Josh Drebit, Donna Soares, Allan Zinyk, James Long in a scene from Cinderella: An East Van Panto. Photo by Emily Cooper.

Mixing eye-wrenching colour and slapstick humour, the traditional English pantomime is a family tradition that plays for the kids while nudging the adults. But Cinderella: An East Van Panto preaches rather than entertains, tossing aside the unrestrained glee of children’s theatre for a tired hipster joke. Read more.

Fighting Chance Productions presents Little Women: The Musical

Fighting Chance Productions presents Little Women: The Musical

Musical theatre may be built upon the music, but success also relies on a clever script and exciting choreography. Sadly, Little Women: The Musical, while musically strong, falls short in those marks of success. Fighting Chance puts up a strong effort, but ultimately cannot overcome the obstacles inherent in this book to musical adaptation. Read more.

20 questions with Sharron Matthews and George Masswohl

20 questions with Sharron Matthews and George Masswohl

Meet Canadian musical theatre couple, Sharron Matthews and George Masswohl. Read more.

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