On Vancouver stages: our weekly round-up from Vancouver Presents

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Jeremy Crittenden. Photo by David Cooper

Our weekly roundup of what’s happening in Vancouver’s arts scene courtesy of Vancouver Presents.

It’s been a busy two months for the Arts Club touring production of Avenue Q (until Jan 3). Since last year’s acclaimed production the show has seen the inside of regional theatres all across BC, from Nanaimo to Kelowna, before heading back to take up residency in Vancouver once again, just in time for the holidays (photo above by David Cooper). Read More.

Pigapicha! not only provides a glimpse into the art-form, it is helping to preserve it as well.

Pigapicha! not only provides a glimpse into the art-form, it is helping to preserve it as well.

Before the dawn of the digital age, Kenyans embraced the colonial introduction of photography through the popularization of studio photography. A forerunner of the ubiquitous modern “selfie”, 180 of these portraits form the upcoming exhibit Pigapicha! (until Apr 5) at the Unviersity of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology. Read more.

Kate Blackburn and Gaelan Beatty in Crazy For You. Photo by David Cooper.

Kate Blackburn and Gaelan Beatty in Crazy For You. Photo by David Cooper.

Talk to a theatre director about shows that they would love to get their hands-on and you’ll invariably get responses like Hamlet or Death of a Salesman. For Vancouver’s Barbara Tomasic though the answer may surprise you, as it is being able to direct Crazy For You, this year’s holiday musical at Richmond’s Gateway Theatre. Read more.

Loon by the Wonderheads. Photo by Giancini Photography.

Loon by the Wonderheads. Photo by Giancini Photography.

There is just something about it; something that coaxes you into remaining absolutely present in each moment. There are no words in the Wonderheads presentation of Loon, but perhaps that’s the key. In a scant fifty minutes, the Wonderheads succeed in pulling back the curtain on our modern obsession with self-awareness and irony to allow a little bit of something sweet, nostalgic, and whimsical to shine through. Read more.

Ins Choi in Subway Stations of the Cross

Ins Choi in Subway Stations of the Cross

On paper, at least, Ins Choi’s Subway Stations of the Cross is a compelling idea. There is little doubt that Choi’s real-life encounter with a homeless man in a Toronto park had a profound effect on him personally given everything that has been written about it.  The real skill though comes from transferring that encounter from his head and heart to the heads and hearts of his audience. Read more.

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