This week on Vancouver stages: Jesus, warthogs, Cadillacs and lice

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Andrew Cohen, Jennifer Copping, and Aubrey Joy Maddock in the Arts Club production of Godspell. Photo by David Cooper.

The Stephen Schwartz and John-Michael Tebelak musical Godspell has always been a bit controversial. From early portrayals of Jesus’ disciples as clowns and hippies, to the 1973 film version set in a contemporary New York City, to the recent Vancouver production that saw it take place inside an episode of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-in, there is an irreverence that has endured. Director Sara-Jeanne Hosie continues that tradition in the upcoming Arts Club production, by casting a woman in the role of Jesus Christ.  Read more.

Photo above: Andrew Cohen, Jennifer Copping, and Aubrey Joy Maddock in the Arts Club production of Godspell. Photo by David Cooper.

Win tickets to Disney's The Lion King by correctly identifying what type of animals are Timon and Pumbaa

Nick Cordileone as Timon and Ben Lipitz as Pumbaa in Disney’s The Lion King

For Nick Cordileone, who plays the self-absorbed Timon in the touring production of Disney’s The Lion King, his Vancouver appearance this month will be a homecoming of sorts. -“I’m really looking forward to coming back to Vancouver,” says Cordileone from the current tour stop in Philadelphia. “Vancouver is actually where I made my debut with Disney’s The Lion King five years ago. We had rehearsed in Costa Mesa, but it was in Vancouver where nine of us made our premiere with the show. Read more.

Colleen Winton as Shelley Levene in the Classic Chic Productions presentation of Glengarry Glen Ross. Photo by Megan Verhey.

Colleen Winton as Shelley Levene in the Classic Chic Productions presentation of Glengarry Glen Ross. Photo by Megan Verhey.

There are no fucking pink Cadillacs in the current production of Glengarry Glen Ross, as the woman of Classic Chic Productions don’t just become the testosterone filled assholes of David Mamet’s play, but prove that solid acting can be genderless. Read more.

The Jessie Awards recognize the best in professional theatre in Vancouver.

The Jessie Awards recognize the best in professional theatre in Vancouver.

It may be an honour just to be nominated, but it sure as hell feels a lot better when you win. The annual Jessie Richardson Theatre Awards (“The Jessies”) are upon us.  Vancouver’s equivalent to the Tonys, the awards recognize excellence in professional theatre locally. While we won’t know until June 22 who walks away with the trophies, this is how I would pick them if I was choosing the winners. Read more.

Stephanie Izsak and Caitlin McCarthy in the Theatre Plexus production of Scratch. Photo by Chicknskratch Productions.

Stephanie Izsak and Caitlin McCarthy in the Theatre Plexus production of Scratch. Photo by Chicknskratch Productions.

We all process grief differently. For playwright Charlotte Corbeil-Coleman, part of her process included writing Scratch. Originally written at the age of sixteen, and reworked over the years following the death of her mother from cancer, Corbeil-Coleman’s Scratch is about as personal as you can get. But while there is little doubt that creating the piece would have helped her move on, there is so little depth to Scratch that her loss becomes too elusive for an audience to truly connect, and at times feels more like a therapy session. Read more.

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